Tag Archives: hydrothermal liquefaction

PNNL awarded for algal biofuel innovation

Developing renewable fuel from wet algae is one of the latest innovations Richland, Washington-based Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has successfully driven to the market with the help of commercial partners. As a result, the Federal Laboratory Consortium has honored the Department Continue reading PNNL awarded for algal biofuel innovation

Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley tours the progress at Daphne’s Algae Systems

DAPHNE, Alabama – Momentum for a renewable fuels start-up company along Mobile Bay in Daphne continued Wednesday with a visit from Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley and the announcement of a $3.2 million federal grant for its continued research in Baldwin County. Continue reading Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley tours the progress at Daphne’s Algae Systems

From seaweed to biofuel: Compressing millions of years into a few minutes

SUGAR KELP seaweed is abundant in Norway, and researchers at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) have developed a way to turn it quickly into biocrude for refining into fuels.

Associate professor Khanh-Quang Tran from NTNU’s department of energy and process engineering says that while Continue reading From seaweed to biofuel: Compressing millions of years into a few minutes

Forget What You’ve Heard: Oil and Gas Are Actually “Renewable” Resources

We’ve been taught that fossil fuels, like oil and natural gas, formed hundreds of millions of years ago. Prehistoric animals that once roamed the earth died. From the buried remains of these animals as well as plants, a natural decomposition process took place that required eons of Continue reading Forget What You’ve Heard: Oil and Gas Are Actually “Renewable” Resources

What if we could turn wastewater and algae into carbon-negative fuels and clean water?

First generation biofuels, like corn ethanol, haven’t fulfilled their promise of displacing fossil fuels in a green, carbon neutral way. It’s because they require a lot of energy to produce and use food crops, competing with people and animals for that supply, driving prices… Continue reading What if we could turn wastewater and algae into carbon-negative fuels and clean water?