Tag Archives: sea lion

Sea lion seizures, toxic algae and the nightmare scenario for the oceans

[USA] A sea lion on a Washington beach curls into a fetal position, shuddering. Then it contorts its neck, craning its head into the air, clearly in distress. NOAA researchers in Washington were horrified by this recent footage from Long Beach: Continue reading Sea lion seizures, toxic algae and the nightmare scenario for the oceans

Dead fish, wildlife in Aleutians may be victims of toxic algae outbreak

[USA] Scientists have been receiving reports of dead and dying mammals, birds and small fish in the Aleutian Islands.  They think the killer might be toxic algae proliferating in unusually warm ocean waters.

“All the signs are that we’re having a Continue reading Dead fish, wildlife in Aleutians may be victims of toxic algae outbreak

Unprecedented toxic algae bloom now in Central Coast waters

[USA] Morro Bay – A massive algae bloom is here: NOAA scientists confirmed Wednesday they found the tail end of a bloom they’ve been tracking for months in the Santa Barbara Channel.

The alga is called Pseudo-nitzschia, and Continue reading Unprecedented toxic algae bloom now in Central Coast waters

‘The Blob,’ Domoic Acid: Extremely Poisonous Toxic Bloom Poses Serious Threat To West Coast

[USA] NOAA has warned communities on North America’s west coast that a deadly algae bloom releasing the toxin domoic acid has reached levels higher than ever recorded. A concentrated area in the Pacific Ocean has been Continue reading ‘The Blob,’ Domoic Acid: Extremely Poisonous Toxic Bloom Poses Serious Threat To West Coast

Sick Sea Lions Could Help Researchers Find New Drugs for Humans, Wildlife

Harmful algal blooms occur when certain types of algae grow out of control and release toxic substances that damage fish, shellfish, birds, marine mammals and humans. In California, sea lions are the most commonly affected and the problem, scientists say, is getting worse. Continue reading Sick Sea Lions Could Help Researchers Find New Drugs for Humans, Wildlife