Lethal parasite evolved from pond scum

[8th, May 2014] A lethal parasite infecting a wide range of insects actually originated from pond scum, according to a genomic investigation by UBC researchers. A team led by UBC Botany’s Patrick Keeling sequenced the genome of Helicosporidium – an intracellular parasite that can kill juvenile blackflies, caterpillars, beetles and… Continue reading Lethal parasite evolved from pond scum

Algae co-products providing protein source in Texas A&M research

[8th, May 2014] While there may be little use for most of the algae growing in Midwestern farm ponds, researchers at Texas A&M University are finding algae co-products can be used in cattle rations. Since algae is 40 percent oil, researchers were trying to determine what could be done with the remaining 60 percent, says Tryon Wickersham, an animal scientist at Texas A&M… Continue reading Algae co-products providing protein source in Texas A&M research

Think filling up your gas tank is painful on your wallet? Imagine $150 a gallon

[8th, May 2014] Imagine $150 a gallon? That is how much the U.S. government — funded by you the taxpayer — shelled out for jet fuel made from algae. The Government Accountability Office (GAO) says the biofuel was bought for testing purposes as part of the FAA’s goal for the aviation industry to use a billion gallons of alternative jet fuel annually by 2018… Continue reading Think filling up your gas tank is painful on your wallet? Imagine $150 a gallon

Researchers Trace River ‘Rock Snot’ to Native Species

Researchers from Canada and Dartmouth University have found that rock snot – a globulous bloom of algae that blossoms in some freshwater riverbeds – more likely stems from changing environmental conditions and global warming, rather than the accidental introduction of new species or the emergence of new genetic strains, as has been previously theorized.

The findings have real implications: The algae, officially known as Didymosphenia geminate… Continue reading Researchers Trace River ‘Rock Snot’ to Native Species